(navigation image)
Home Animation & Cartoons | Arts & Music | Community Video | Computers & Technology | Cultural & Academic Films | Ephemeral Films | Movies | News & Public Affairs | Prelinger Archives | Spirituality & Religion | Sports Videos | Television | Videogame Videos | Vlogs | Youth Media
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload

View movie

item imageitem imageitem imageitem image

View thumbnails
Run time: 5:19

Play / Download (help[help])

(19.8 M)512Kb MPEG4
(20.3 M)Ogg Video
(201.1 M)MPEG2


All Files: HTTPS
[Public Domain]

Resources

Bookmark

Princess Nicotine (1909)

something has gone horribly wrong 8-p
Prefer flash? · Embed · Questions/Feedback?

Comedic short that pits a smoker against a tiny fairy, brought to life through early special effects.

Preserved by the Library of Congress.


This movie is part of the collection: Short Format Films

Production Company: Vitagraph Company
Audio/Visual: Silent, Black and White
Keywords:

Creative Commons license: Public Domain


Individual Files

Movie Files MPEG2 Ogg Video 512Kb MPEG4
Princess Nicotine 201.1 MB
20.3 MB
19.8 MB
Image Files Animated GIF Thumbnail
Princess Nicotine 129.4 KB
4.8 KB
Information FormatSize
princess_nicotine_1909_files.xml Metadata [file]
princess_nicotine_1909_meta.xml Metadata 950.0 B
princess_nicotine_1909_reviews.xml Metadata 3.4 KB

Write a review
Downloaded 17,307 times
Reviews
Average Rating: 4.75 out of 5 stars4.75 out of 5 stars4.75 out of 5 stars4.75 out of 5 stars4.75 out of 5 stars

Reviewer: Darren Nemeth - 5.00 out of 5 stars5.00 out of 5 stars5.00 out of 5 stars5.00 out of 5 stars5.00 out of 5 stars - January 4, 2010
Subject: "one of the finest trick films made in the United States."
"Princess Nicotine" (1909) is discussed in the book "Moving pictures, how they are made and worked (1912)" by Frederick Arthur Ambros Talbot.

The author opens with

""Princess Nicotine" ranks as one of the finest trick films made in the United States."

and remarks...

"..mystifying from beginning to end."

You can view this book from its archive.org page.
http://www.archive.org/details/cu31924030699445

16 pages are devoted to this early Vitagraph trick film.

11 pages of text and 5 pages of illustrations.

Find it beginning on page 242 of the book or 332 of the digital file.

This book also discusses a lot of other trick films, animation and microscopic movies.

Reviewer: Sixbluemonkeys - 5.00 out of 5 stars5.00 out of 5 stars5.00 out of 5 stars5.00 out of 5 stars5.00 out of 5 stars - January 30, 2007
Subject: Ahead of it's time
This film is a superb example that a special effects film can be made without color,sound, or "digital effects laboratory." By far the most enjoyable silent short I've ever seen.

Reviewer: Wilford B. Wolf - 5.00 out of 5 stars5.00 out of 5 stars5.00 out of 5 stars5.00 out of 5 stars5.00 out of 5 stars - July 30, 2005
Subject: Must be smokin' that wacky tobacky...
Beautifully preserved short that shows the influence on American filmmakers by George Méliès, the pioneer of trick photography and special effects.

This short is very much in the Melies tradition. It starts with a man in a parlour smoking a pipe. We then cut to an iris shot with oversized props of two mischievious tobacco fairies, one of whom is being stuffed into a pipe. The two humorously battle, playing pranks on one another. About halfway through the short, the background disappears, but this is to allow for some of the real highlights of this film. Halfway through the film, we seen a fabulous stop motion animation sequence where a flower becomes a cigar, an fine early example of the art. (The first animated film only came out three years before this one reeler in 1906.) After the man returns to smoke the cigar, we are treated to a complicated inset shot, with the fairy first setting fire to some matches, and then the man retaliating with a spritzer bottle. Any time we see the fairy close, it is through an iris, but in this case, when we see the man, we also see the fairy on the table dodging the water. This effect is executed beautifully and looks believable nearly 100 years later.

This is a wonderful gem of early film history.

Reviewer: dog from Nightwatch - 4.00 out of 5 stars4.00 out of 5 stars4.00 out of 5 stars4.00 out of 5 stars - July 24, 2005
Subject: Clever if not strange.
A weird little film but interesting and quite enjoyable.